Category Archives: spirituality

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Visionary gathering brings regenerative development to Caribbean shores

All the pieces are beginning to come together for the XV Vision Council – Guardians of the Earth “Call of the Water” gathering. This year, the itinerant ecovillage and high-impact social movement has set its sights on Mexico’s Caribbean coast near the border with Belize. The gathering is set for the shores of the magnificent Laguna de Bacalar, which in Mayan means “Gate of the sky where the reed grows,” also known as the Lagoon of Seven Colors.

Sian Ka’an Bakhalal, the Lagoon of Seven Colors – site of the XV Vision Council, the Call of the Water

This year, as it was in 1992, the goal is to protect a unique coastal ecosystem, organizers say.

“We are talking about a unique lagoon ecosystem in imminent danger,” said Santiago Palomar, one of the event organizers. Palomar and others on the team have been working to strengthen community networks and to teach techniques applicable for protecting the bioregion.

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Spirituality Council, XIV Vision Council – Call of the Sage, Teopantli Kalpulli, Jalisco, Mexico, 2015. (Santiago Palomar photo)

For seven days in November-December, hundreds of environmentalists, healers, artists, activists, spiritual seekers and people from all walks of life will create community for a gathering which, unlike most festivals, is designed to leave the site better than they found it. From Nov. 26-Dec. 3, the open-air ecovillage will be the site of workshops, ceremonies, forums, performances and celebrations, all geared toward shifting the paradigm to one more in tune with the rhythms of the planet.
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A wall in their river: Flooded Ngäbe communities continue to fight dam

Above: Döegeo Gallardo and Göejet Miranda paddle home through the dead zone that was once a shady, fish-filled river. (Tracy L. Barnett)

By Tracy L. Barnett
For Global Sisters Report

Kiad, Ngäbe-Buglé Comarca, Panama – “Bulu Bagama is my positive name. Luis Jiménez, my negative one,” the Ngäbe elder began, standing on an expanse of cracked mud that covered what for generations was his family patrimony. A tumbledown shell of a house lay in ruins, and a few dead leaves clinging to one remaining tree provided scant shade from the sweltering midday sun.

The words, referring to his indigenous name and the one imposed by the dominant Spanish culture, summed up the feelings of betrayal from a people that has fought bitterly for nearly two decades to stop the Barro Blanco dam, a hydroelectric project that to local communities and environmentalists has become a symbol of everything that’s wrong with the current model of development in Panama.

Bulu and his wife, Adelaida González, stood in the mud and recalled that terrible night last August when they awoke to find the waters of their sacred Tabasará River seeping into their home. They scrambled to collect their children and as many of their possessions as possible. Neighbors weren’t so lucky; their houses were completely washed downstream. A child narrowly escaped drowning in those harrowing hours.

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Lessons from Standing Rock

By Tracy L. Barnett

STEELE, N.D., Dec 8 – We only made it 70 miles from Oceti Sakowin Camp in Standing Rock when a whiteout and fierce winds forced us to seek refuge in this tiny town, where the Kidder County Ambulance District and a wonderful EMT nurse named Mona Thompson took us in like a mother. Mona, we soon learned, has led her volunteer emergency services in manning the front lines on the reservation side after the attacks on the Water Protectors from the paid law enforcement personnel of neighboring Morton County. This improvised emergency shelter is filled with people, many of them coming from or going to Standing Rock, and were up until all hours talking about this historic phenomenon and how it has impacted them and the nation. I will share more about Mona and her story soon.

As for myself I am moved more deeply than words can express. To see the quiet resolve on the part of our Native brothers and sisters, to see their compassion for us in the face of our distress – both physical, for the bitter cold, and emotional, for the bitter truths we are facing. Not for the first time but for the strongest time, face to face with those that our government has deceived and betrayed time after time over the past 250 years, and it keeps going on.

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San Antonio Missions preserve Native American history in Texas’ first World Heritage Site

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Story and photos by Tracy L. Barnett
For The Washington Post

Two weathered gravestones sit in a small, dusty rectangle in front of the grand Spanish church at the heart of the nation’s newest UNESCO World Heritage Site, the San Antonio Missions. I’ve been to Mission San Jose many times — to attend the lively Mariachi Mass, to photograph its antique majesty, to reflect on the history of this place and its role in the settlement of the American Southwest. But this is the first time I’ve thought of it as a cemetery.

I’m seeing it through the eyes of two direct descendants of the missions’ original inhabitants, members of the Tap Pilam Coahuiltecan Nation, whose ancestors inhabited this part of what is now Texas for thousands of years. Some 300 years ago, they helped to build these missions, and their descendants maintain a vital connection to them.

Last year the five missions, spread out over about 12 miles along the San Antonio River, received the coveted designation of World Heritage Site. Four of them are still active Catholic parishes, attended by some of the original Native American descendants; the fifth, Mission San Antonio de Valero, went on to become a military garrison — the legendary Alamo, now converted into a memorial to the battle fought there.

Ramón Vásquez, a straight-talking Texan with a dark ponytail, and the soft-spoken Jesús “Jesse” Reyes Jr., an anthropologist in a cowboy hat and bolo tie, are my guides today. Ramón, executive director of a nonprofit organization called the American Indians in Texas, has teamed up with Jesse to create Yanawana Mission Tours — named for the pre-Hispanic name for the San Antonio River — which offers an eye-opening perspective not just on the missions, but also on American history itself.

Read the rest of the story here

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The Call of the Sage: The seed has sprouted

Above: First Encounter, Vision Council: Call of the Sage – Teopantli Kalpulli (November 2015).

By Laura Angélica Almazán

Laura Angelica AlmazanThe call of the caracol has called us together once again. The family has reunited one more time to continue with a mission that started more than two decades ago, and gets more and more relevant every year. The more difficult the times seem to be, the more heavily the economic, environmental and social crises weigh, not only in Mexico, but all around the planet, the fact that the Guardians of the Earth keep on gathering to sow seeds of change is a light of hope in the middle of the darkness that seems to rule the world.

The Vision Council-Guardians of the Earth is an organization dedicated to creating encounters where people who believe that a better world is possible can carry out a living and not virtual experiment of building a utopia that is turning into an ecotopia, to offer up their knowledge and talents in service of the Pacha Mama, and concur with other activists for life who believe that the solutions for today’s problems is to focus on the possibilities instead of the protests, to engage instead of worrying, to build instead of destroying. Continue reading

El Llamado de Quetzalcoatl: Materializando la Visión

Closing circle
Por Tracy L. Barnett
Traducido por Angélica Narákuri

TEMICTLA, México – Si alguna vez hubo duda de que Quetzalcóatl vive, esa duda fue disipada en una luminosa, húmeda y brillante semana en el corazón de México.

Aquí en Temictla, un valle sagrado, una pequeña ecoaldea y un centro de retiro espiritual en el borde de Chalmita, un destino de peregrinaje para millones de personas de diversas tradiciones, una extensa familia se reunió bajo la luz de la luna creciente, en Noviembre de 2013. Es una familia de muchas naciones y muchas tradiciones, una familia cuyos miembros multitudinarios se han dedicado en cuerpo y alma a la supervivencia de la humanidad y de la vida en la Tierra.

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1,000 Drums in Guadalajara

 
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The ancestors must have been smiling as a small procession representing the element of Fire, dressed in red and white, made its way through the crowded city streets of the Guadalajara historic center, beating an ancient rhythm with their ceremonial drums and trailing the smoke of copal from their saumadores. Traffic and shoppers stopped to marvel at the spectacle, and a few tagged along.

As we approached the Plaza Tapatía, we began to hear the drums. The drums in our hands trembled as if to join them; we felt the vibration in the air and under our feet. As rounded the corner into the Esplanada Hospicio Cabañas a spectacular sight greeted our eyes – thousands of participants filled the plaza, grouped in rings around the ceremonial fire and groups of drummers beating in unison on massive table-sized drums. We followed the procession around the circle and took our places carefully on an elaborately assembled mandala made of various colors of sawdust and the four colors of corn.

The purpose of the event was to unify our hearts with each other, with the Mother Earth and with all of humanity, ultimately raising the consciousness of all who witnessed it, and helping raise the planetary vibration to one more in harmony with each other and with our environment. As we looked around at the smiling, dancing, drumming beings all around us and listened to the words of the event organizers – Ana Teresa Sánchez from Casa Lahak,  our own Abuela Esperanza from Teopantli Kalpulli and many, many more – we felt the pulsing rhythm pound its way through our own drums to our hearts.

Here are a few images from this truly amazing event.

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