Tag Archives: Maria de Jesus Patricio Martinez

Left to right: Faustina Poot Cruz Xhazil community representative, María de Jesús Patricio Martínez, first indigenous woman attempting to be president of Mexico and councilwoman Lizbeth Morán Fabián.

Marichuy, Mexico’s indigenous candidate: My goal goes beyond being president

By Angélica Almazán

“We do not bring promises, we do not bring anything to give away, more than the heart, more than sweat, more than the effort of each day. It has been a difficult road because people no longer believe in anything and are tired of hearing promises. That is why we are not promising things. We are launching a call to the organization of society, to a union that goes beyond elections. This is the moment of youth, of childhood, of women. It is time for us to be aware that we can move forward together.”

As young councilor Yamili Chan Dzu gives her speech, Marichuy’s eyes roam the small crowd. There’s only a little over a hundred people there. Unlike the mass meetings of the political parties, where trucks arrive full of people from all the neighboring communities to listen to the candidate in turn, this event of the Indigenous Council of Government has not been able to gather more than a handful of artists, reporters and some other clueless souls who heard what was happening and approached, perhaps moved by curiosity to see the small white cloth at the entrance of the Chan Santa Cruz Cultural Center that read: “This event is totally peaceful, for the people and of the people, unrelated to any political party”.

Although Quintana Roo is home to one of the largest indigenous populations among all the states in Mexico, it is the first time that the Indigenous Government Council has held a public event to collect signatures in the state and the outlook is not encouraging. At the time of this event, there were not even two months left before the Feb 19 deadline — and they had barely managed to gather 10% of the 1 million signatures necessary for her placement on the national ballot. That day in Felipe Carrillo Puerto, a population of more than 25 thousand inhabitants, only about 60 people signed.

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